Five Minute Friday: Hide

Here are the rules: Write for five minutes. No editing, no deleting, just writing, then posting. Link up, post your link, then visit others who linked up.

START:

My momma came from a softer generation, where you get a grip and bite your lip just to save a little face.~~Momma’s Broken Heart, Miranda Lambert

For my entire life I hid. What I hid was a terrible truth. As a child I hid my parents’ abuse, as an adult I hid my husband’s abuse. I did so, because, sadly, the church told me to. I was told I was in sin if I didn’t lie about my parents because to tell the truth about their abuse was to dishonor them. And dishonoring your parents is worse than abuse. I was told it was a sin if I didn’t lie about my husband’s abuse because the truth about his abuse (and addiction/adultery) would show that I was disrespectful and not submissive to him. And to “usurp his authority” is worse than abuse.

Funny thing happened when I started telling the truth, though, people started to open up to me. At first it was overwhelming, all the women, inside and out the church, abused and treated with contempt by their husbands. Then it became empowering, because I realized that as I spoke the truth, more women could be set free from this misery that nearly drove me to end my own life.

When we hide we are alone, we are despondent. When we come out of hiding, when we share the truth, people welcome us, the right people welcome us. When we hide, quite honestly God is not glorified. When we come out of hiding, His Truth goes out and we will see amazing things happen.

STOP

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9 Comments Add yours

  1. Sharing our stories makes us a light-filled, truthful, REAL community, instead of what I also experienced in church – a place of masks, control, cover-up, and robotic people. Being silent about abuse is to be an accomplice to evil (Martin Luther King Jr)… how it came about that we learned to suffer in silence, empowering evil, is still way beyond my imagination.

    I’m so glad you’re speaking up! And opening the prison door for others to come out and SHINE!

    1. sarasamomx5 says:

      Thanks. I wonder how we became so deceived, myself. I do have a few theories, but those don’t make it easier ๐Ÿ™‚ I now believe that if we are open and truthful about our suffering, more people around us will be open to the gospel.

  2. Nina says:

    Thanks for stopping by blog, because I have now stumbled on yours. Thank you for sharing your story, I pray that the words you type and speak continue to be used to help others heal. This is going to my journal, ” When we hide, quite honestly God is not glorified. “

    1. sarasamomx5 says:

      I’m glad you found that line helpful. I’ve only recently learned that truth.

  3. Joy Lenton says:

    Thank you for sharing your testimony. Your openness and vulnerability are vehicles which God will use to help heal , bless and encourage others who share some of your history. I can relate to childhood abuse and the shame and pain it engenders. But I can also testify to how sharing my story is helping me to heal and (hopefully) creating a safe place where others can feel less alone. May God bless you and your family as you journey with Him. ๐Ÿ™‚

    1. sarasamomx5 says:

      That’s wonderful to hear. I am sure many people have been helped by your openness.

  4. Annie Rim says:

    I am so glad you have found freedom! You are so brave to share your story, and as you share it you encourage others. Thank you for coming out of hiding! (Visiting from FMF)

  5. Melissa says:

    I’m so glad you’ve come out of hiding! I totally agree! I understand how your history would be hard to reveal. I hid my depression for years because I was afraid of how people will react. Once I did, though, people came forward and said that they’d been through a similar experience. It’s hard to see depression as a blessing, but it has opened up relationships for mutual encouragement.

    1. sarasamomx5 says:

      Your comment reminded me that this wasn’t the first time this has happened to me. My second child was born with a life-threatening birth defect that still claims 50% of the children with it. When I found out, may people came to me and told me about their own lost children. It was as if they knew that fact would be safe with me. I’m glad you opened up, you are right, it is a source of mutual encouragement to do so. ๐Ÿ™‚

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